21 July 2014

NOT THE MARIETTA TIMES

0830 by Jeff Hess

TODAY’S MARIETTA TIMES FRONT PAGE

Today’s headlines include:

Local News

Oldest home in Belpre
Horse show raises funds for HSOV
Small plane crash leaves three dead
Gallons of ice cream devoured
Adding a little richness to life

Top Headlines Poll: What was your favorite part of the annual Broughton Ice Cream Social?

What’s going on here

Previously

21 July 2014

BULL SHIT TO TRAINING YOUR WRITER…

0715 by Jeff Hess

This is my exercise in shoveling out the blogpile…

21 July 2014

RULE NO. 19: AVOID ROBO-CHEF FOODS…

0600 by Jeff Hess

Rule No. 19 – Eat Only Foods That Have Been Cooked by Humans.

From Food Rules, an eater’s manual by Michael Pollan

Previously…

Found in my electronic chapbook. See also Eating Mindfully by Jan Chozen Bey.

20 July 2014

ROLDO RIGHTS ON FORBES:
HE WAS SO GOOD AT BEING BAD…

1428 by Jeff Hess

George Forbes, not any mayor, was the most powerful political figure of our era. He ruled at a time when public money flowed to major developers. He was the grease that made it flow.

Forbes clearly dominated Cleveland politics for most of two decades – 1970s and 1980s – that coincided with my time at City Hall. He was a figure who commanded attention. He so controlled civic affairs that he had to be the central focus of any reporter’s work in this period.

He became what he would consider a target of my coverage. My means of comment was a small bi-weekly newsletter. He became a central theme. So much so that when he decided not to run again he let me know that it would affect my ability to make a living. “Sheeeet, you won’t be able to eat now,” he said in his pithy street talk. Meaning: Losing him as a target no one would want to read me. Actually, I lasted a decade without him.

But he never totally left my sights.

Forbes – a Democrat by party but a Corporatist in ruling – maintained a dominant hold over big decisions at Cleveland City Hall. What made it crucial was the fact that most major public building projects here were constructed in Cleveland. Legislation had to pass through City Council. Forbes stood at the door. You had to have his pass to move. And everyone knew it.

He is/was the kind of Democrat that unfortunately has given government – because of attention to special interests instead of the needs of most people – a bad name. His kind of special interest politics, as with the County corruption officials, sours many on government.

He may have changed Cleveland history. He took office in 1974 and served through 1989. It was the city’s steepest decline in this era. The city’s population went from 750,000 in 1970 to 505,000 in 1990. We can’t blame him alone for that but along with the city’s elite he was a contributing factor.

Had Carl Stokes remained in town, Cleveland politics may not have taken such a corporate turn. Stokes, who left the city for New York City after his second term (1971), was not enamored with the Cleveland corporate community, especially at the end of his tenure. Stokes exhibited a progressive and civil rights attitude toward issues.

Forbes, in contrast, went into business with those who often needed favors from city hall. He was a partner with James Carney, a mayoral candidate and millionaire Democratic party boss in the 1970s; Pete Boyas, the refuse king (Forbes once eliminated an entire city department to rid Boyas of Lisa Thomas who gave Boyas problems); Jim Stanton, a former Council President; and the Rzepkas, Fred, Peter and Harry. His law firm represented GSX, the tenants at a public housing project and even the city’s Board of Education.

He directed two super subsidy gifts to Dick Jacobs worth more than $250 million, though one was never completed. He came later to represent Jacobs. (Jacobs showed up before Forbes with one project worth $120-million in abatements with a model carried in a black garbage bag. Exiting the meeting Jacobs dodged reporters Continue Reading »

20 July 2014

NOT THE (SUNDAY) MARIETTA TIMES…

0830 by Jeff Hess

TODAY’S PARKERSBURG NEWS AND SENTINEL FRONT PAGE

Today’s headlines include:

Local News

Attendance Boost
Martirano sets goals for schools
Officials: Dangerous animal list needs revisions
‘I Shop Locally’ returns
Lee’s Studio still growing after 30 years

Top Headlines Poll: Do you believe a manned craft will make it to Mars in your lifetime?

What’s going on here

Previously

20 July 2014

PEAK ATTENTION TO PERVOCRACY…

0715 by Jeff Hess

This is my exercise in shoveling out the blogpile…

20 July 2014

Rule No. 18: EAT CLOSER TO THE EARTH…

0600 by Jeff Hess

Rule No. 18 – Eat Closer To The Earth.

From Food Rules, an eater’s manual by Michael Pollan

Previously…

Found in my electronic chapbook. See also Eating Mindfully by Jan Chozen Bey.

19 July 2014

COMING TO A DORMANT FAULT NEAR YOU…

0835 by Jeff Hess

States where hydraulic fracturing is taking place have seen a surge in earthquake activity, raising suspicions that the unconventional drilling method could be to blame, especially the wells where the industry disposes of its wastewater.

Fracking generates vast amounts of wastewater, far more than traditional drilling methods. The water is pumped into injection wells, which send the waste thousands of feet underground. No one knows for certain exactly what happens to the liquids after that. Scientists wonder whether they could trigger quakes by increasing underground pressures and lubricating faults.

Oklahoma has recorded nearly 250 small-to-medium earthquakes since January, according to statistics kept by the U.S. Geological Survey. That’s close to half of all the magnitude 3 or higher earthquakes recorded this year in the continental United States.

A study published earlier this month in the journal Science suggests that just four wells injecting massive amounts of drilling wastewater into the ground are probably shaking up much of the state, accounting for one out of every five quakes from the eastern border of Colorado to the Atlantic coast.

Another concern is whether injection well operators could be pumping either too much water into the ground or pumping it at exceedingly high pressures.

Most of the quakes in areas where injection wells are clustered are too weak to cause serious damage or endanger lives. Yet they’ve led some states, including Ohio, Oklahoma and California, to introduce new rules compelling drillers to measure the volumes and pressures of their injection wells as well as to monitor seismicity during fracking operations.

Emily Schmall and Justin Juozapavicius writing in States With Fracking See Surge In Earthquake Activity for The Huffington Post.

19 July 2014

NOT THE MARIETTA TIMES

0830 by Jeff Hess

TODAY’S MARIETTA TIMES FRONT PAGE

Today’s headlines include:

Local News

Big cleanup
Sweet Corn Festival continues Saturday
Computer business owner investigated
Strickland visits
Free meds: Grocery chain helping to combat high blood pressure

Top Headlines Poll: Who do you believe is responsible for the downed Malaysian flight 17?

What’s going on here

Previously

19 July 2014

LAY V. LIE TO WAL-WEALTHIER…

0715 by Jeff Hess

This is my exercise in shoveling out the blogpile… With the posting of nos. 9 and 10 I have now shoveled down to items less than two-years-old.

19 July 2014

RULE NO. 17: SNACK FROM THE FARMER’S MARKET…

0600 by Jeff Hess

Rule No. 17 – Buy Your Snacks At The Farmers’ Market.

From Food Rules, an eater’s manual by Michael Pollan

Previously…

Found in my electronic chapbook. See also Eating Mindfully by Jan Chozen Bey.

18 July 2014

JOHNNY WINTER: 1944-2014…

0927 by Jeff Hess

18 July 2014

NOT THE MARIETTA TIMES

0830 by Jeff Hess

TODAY’S MARIETTA TIMES FRONT PAGE

Today’s headlines include:

Local News

Just three hours to guilty verdict
$42,000 paid back
Middle man in court
6 months for theft from elder
Tickets for texting start Sat.

Top Headlines Poll: Will you attend the Marietta Sweet Corn Festival this weekend?

What’s going on here

Previously

18 July 2014

ZUCCHINI TO ON THE BUS WITH OBAMA …

0715 by Jeff Hess

This is my exercise in shoveling out the blogpile…

18 July 2014

RULE NO. 16: GO FOOD SHOPPING WEEKLY…

0600 by Jeff Hess

Rule No. 16 – Go Food Shopping Every Week.

From Food Rules, an eater’s manual by Michael Pollan

Previously…

Found in my electronic chapbook. See also Eating Mindfully by Jan Chozen Bey.

17 July 2014

MY SUMMER READING ROOM…

1129 by Jeff Hess


A good book and a gin and tonic… Life is good…

17 July 2014

NOT THE MARIETTA TIMES

0830 by Jeff Hess

TODAY’S MARIETTA TIMES FRONT PAGE

Today’s headlines include:

Local News

My Main Street
Witnesses discuss fatal incident
Man shot by police critical
Marietta man gets one year
Eyesore at center of court case

Top Headlines Poll: Will you attend the Marietta Sweet Corn Festival this weekend?

What’s going on here

Previously

17 July 2014

POLITICAL CASH TO COMPLAINTS ON COMPLAINTS…

0715 by Jeff Hess

This is my exercise in shoveling out the blogpile…

17 July 2014

RULE NO. 15: PICTURE YOUR FOOD AU NATURAL…

0600 by Jeff Hess

Rule No. 15 – Eat Foods Made From Ingredients That You Can Picture in Their Raw State or Growing in Nature.

From Food Rules, an eater’s manual by Michael Pollan

Previously…

Found in my electronic chapbook. See also Eating Mindfully by Jan Chozen Bey.

16 July 2014

THE FCC WILL FENCE IN THE COMMONS…

0852 by Jeff Hess

You can count on the big carriers – the Comcasts and the Verizons – to churn up a propaganda storm in coming months, supplementing their mega-million-dollar lobbying campaign in Washington. There will be the usual statements, which often turn out to be misleading or outright false, from official spokespeople. But watch out for the less obvious stuff – the opinion laundering via the telecoms’ legion of front groups and other allies, many of whom are being paid for their help. Those allies will range from unions to think tanks to academics to advocacy organizations that, at first glance, have no reason to be taking a stand on something as basic as internet traffic. And the telecoms will no doubt hope that the journalists who quote these people won’t check to see if that’s what’s going on.

There will, of course, be some of this on the pro-net neutrality side. I’m no fan of hidden agendas, even when I agree with them, but I’m confident that the people who want an open Internet have every reason, unlike those who want corporate control, to stand behind their own words on this issue.

This is an election year. If you care about the freedom of information, you should grill the people who are running for office where you live – and vote and donate your time and money accordingly.

If they’re running for local office, get them on the record in support of publicly financed local broadband networks. If they’re running for state office, get them on the record for blocking or repealing laws that would prohibit such publicly funded networks and other competition. If they want to go to Congress, get them on the record for net neutrality, expanded unlicensed wireless spectrum, stronger antitrust regulation of the ISPs, and federal pre-emption of laws blocking local competition.

Net neutrality is so important to me that I might well vote for someone whose positions on many other issues were counter to my own, as long as he or she persuaded me of a commitment to an open internet.

Dan Gilmore writing in If the FCC is going to kill net neutrality, it’ll have to get through you and me first for The Guardian.

Action links: Protecting and Promoting the Open Internet, Proceeding 14-28.

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