MUSE VS. DEMIURGE. WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE…?

January 14th, 2018

So, I subscribe to the Merriam-Webster Word Of The Day email and this morning the word is Demiurge. If I had no idea what the word means—and I didn’t—I might attempt to parse the syllables and come up with half (demi) impulse (urge), and be completely wrong.

Demiurge, according to MW is one that is an autonomous creative force or decisive power.

When I read that, I immediately associated the word with muse, and I may not be totally wrong on that.

In the Platonic school of philosophy, the Demiurge is a deity who fashions the physical world in the light of eternal ideas. In the Timaeus, Plato credits the Demiurge with taking preexisting materials of chaos and arranging them in accordance with the models of eternal forms. Nowadays, the word demiurge can refer to the individual or group chiefly responsible for a creative idea, as in “the demiurge behind the new hit TV show.” Demiurge derives, via Late Latin, from Greek d?miourgos, meaning “artisan,” or “one with special skill.” The demi- part of the word comes from the Greek noun d?mos, meaning “people”; the second part comes from the word for worker, ergon. Despite its appearance, it is unrelated to the word urge.

I really like the idea that a Demiurge [takes] preexisting materials of chaos and arranging them in accordance with the models of eternal forms.

How do other writers—and all creative folk—feel about that?

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