TEN WAYS TO KILL CLEVELAND…

January 29th, 2007

Sometimes the counter-intuitive allows you to open your mind and see through to alternative goals and pathways. Perhaps to understand how to save something you figure out the best way to destroy it. Then do the opposite. What I find interesting about this list from Reg Adkins at Life Hack is that applies quite nicely regardless of the size of your community.

Provide subsidies which retard the natural evolution of the local economy.

Migrate all governmental authority to locations distant from the community.

Siphon off any gifted community leaders into the larger government body.

Train residents to rely on outside parties for leadership and guidance.

Centralize manufacturing to the extinction the local craftsman/artisan.

Through lending practices create an undesirable local market.

Draw as many wage earning males out of the community as possible.

Encourage inflation by the steady increase in wage earning at the lowest level.

Encourage lower paying service industry development over manufacturing.

Allow a build up of substandard, low cost housing to corral the poor in one area.

What do you think is the best way to destroy Cleveland?

10 Responses to “TEN WAYS TO KILL CLEVELAND…”

  1. Reg Adkins says:

    I’m glad you liked the post. Just now I working on a series examining PsyOps, marketing, and using them to achieve community goals.

    Check them out!

    Peace!
    Reg

  2. Tara Z says:

    This is a great post and it is very applicable. I would say not making use of the lake. Lake Erie is a great resource… it would be greater if there was more access to it.

  3. Jeff Hess says:

    Shalom Tara,

    First, thank you for stopping in, for reading and, most importantly, for taking the time to write a comment, it’s all about the conversation.

    That true. You’re absolutely right.

    Having lived in California where all beach is public beach, I’ve always been amazed that Cleveland allows private entities to monopolize our single most important resource. With the exception of port facilities and marinas, the entire coastline of Lake Erie should be open to public access and use.

    B’shalom,

    Jeff

  4. Jeff Hess says:

    Shalom Reg,

    First, thank you for stopping in, for reading and, most importantly, for taking the time to write a comment, it’s all about the conversation.

    I’m hoping that your list will provoke some discussion here in Cleveland. Thank you for putting it together.

    B’shalom,

    Jeff

  5. christine says:

    It starts with a “G” and rhymes with “rambling.”

    Otherwise, I have to agree with Tara, only I’d get slightly spookier…sometimes I’ve wondered if Cleveland’s decline was precipitated by its disrespect for Erie. But then again, I’ve inherited a heap of superstition about the lakes from generations of ancestors who have worked on them…..

  6. Anita says:

    I fear this is what’s happening all across this great country. But, how can we get the right people to listen?

  7. Reg Adkins says:

    That is just the point, Anita. WE (you and I) are the right people. Keeping writing comments on great blogs like this one, send letters to the editor (for the technologically challenged :)) Nothing clears away the unreasonable like a strong dose of scrutiny.
    Peace!
    Reg

  8. Jeff Hess says:

    Shalom Christine,

    Hmmm… Do you suppose the curse of Rocky Colavito could be related?

    B’shalom,

    Jeff

  9. Jeff Hess says:

    Shalom Reg,

    That’s true. You’re absolutely right.

    B’shalom,

    Jeff

  10. Jeff Hess says:

    Shalom Anita,

    First, thank you for stopping in, for reading and, most importantly, for taking the time to write a comment. It’s all about the conversation.

    I think the best answer to your question is that we must never remain silent.

    B’shalom,

    Jeff

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